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In the main lesson, you learned that probability tells you the likelihood that an event will happen.

In this extension, you will make a table in Google Sheets to visualize and solve a probability problem.

Visualization makes it easier to understand a problem and develop a plan to solve it.

Imagine your class is taking a field trip on a bus.

There are ten rows of seats on the bus, and each row has four seats.

Your teacher will assign each student a seat.

You will calculate the probability of being assigned an aisle seat.

Then, you will calculate the probability of being assigned a seat beside your best friend.

To do this, you will make a map of the seating arrangement by creating a table.

To start, open a new tab in your browser, then go to Google dot com.

Select Drive, and open your probability spreadsheet.

Next, add a new sheet.

Name it.

Now, select a range of cells containing ten rows and four columns.

Start with cell B4 to leave space to label your table.

Add borders to create a grid to represent each seat on the bus.

Name the rows and columns.

Bold the numbers and titles to make them stand out.

Make the titles Window and Aisle different colors so you can tell them apart.

The rows and columns of your table represent all the available seats on the bus.

Next, calculate the likelihood of being assigned an aisle seat.

To do this, divide the number of aisle seats by the total number of seats.

Calculate the total number of seats.

Multiply the number of rows in your grid by the number of columns.

Record this information in a cell below your table.

Now, use your table to calculate the probability of being assigned an aisle seat.

In your table, two of the four columns represent aisle seats.

That means half the total available seats are on the aisle.

To calculate probability, divide aisle seats by total seats.

Add a heading, and create a formula.

Convert it to a percentage... and round the decimal.

Nice work!

Now, calculate the probability of being assigned a seat next to your best friend.

In this example, your best friend got the front row window seat on the right side of the bus.

Add a new visual element to your table to see the problem clearly.

Add a fill color for your best friend’s seat.

You can clearly see that there is only one way you can sit next to your best friend: if you have the front row aisle seat on the right side.

To calculate the probability of sitting beside your best friend, divide the number one by the total number of seats.

Remember, now that your best friend has a seat, there are 39, not 40, available seats.

Add a heading, and create a formula.

Convert it to a percentage... and round the decimal.

Compare your results.

You have a much greater chance at getting an aisle seat than sitting next to your best friend.

There are 20 ways to get an aisle seat, but there is only one way to sit beside your best friend.

Great job visualizing and solving a probability problem in Google Sheets!

Now, it’s your turn: Look at your table to visualize the problem, And create a formula to calculate probability.

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Choose an extension from the list to continue learning ways to use Google Sheets to perform calculations.
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