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6. Sheets: Add Conditional Formatting to Emphasize Data

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In previous videos, you used several methods for organizing and filtering data in your spreadsheet, including sorting and filter views, to make it easier to find the information you’re looking for. In this video, you will use conditional formatting to call attention to important data. “Conditional formatting” changes the background color of cells if they contain specific information.

This helps you and your collaborators see the most important parts of the data without having to read through the entire sheet. You can use conditional formatting to change the color of the cells if the value is below zero. For example: a financial loss, a sale is made online instead of by a team member, or a value is above a certain threshold. For example: if a customer orders more than five shirts.

In this lesson, you will use conditional formatting to emphasize areas with financial losses, sales made on a specific date, and one other condition of your choosing.

To start, open the “Cost, Revenue, and Profit” sheet.

Then, open the conditional formatting menu.

Apply conditional formatting to any cell that has a value below zero. This will show you where there were financial losses. By highlighting this, you can see what products aren’t performing and use that information to guide future business decisions.

You might use this information to decide not to order these shirts for the fundraiser next year, increase the price to cover the business costs, or decrease the price to encourage more sales.

Then, apply conditional formatting to another type of data, such as sales made on a specific date. This information could show whether a specific date, such as a school sports event, brought in more sales than an average day, for instance.

Set at least one more conditional formatting rule to your sheets, such as current sales above ten or below five shirts.

You might also use conditional formatting to emphasize costs above a certain amount in your personal budget spreadsheet, due dates in your school assignment list, task status in a work project plan, or upcoming deadlines in your job search timeline.

Now, it’s your turn: Apply conditional formatting rules to values below zero, sales made on a specific date, and at least one other type of data in your spreadsheet.

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Instructions

  1. Apply conditional formatting rules to values below zero, sales made on a specific date, and at least one other term in your spreadsheet.